About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
of the bombs was me, this miserable thing because they needed everybody possible to be working on pr, and a thousand other things that was constant, you know, liaison with the navy and spanish air force and just incredible stuff. i became director of the continent americana, and i -- now i had my own shop, my own staff, had my own secretary and assistant and staff, and i mean, culture, who cared about culture, the world nearly disappeared. who cared about culture. let rockland take care of culture. the incarceration, where ambassador duke was shaking hands with somebody, and i'm in the pictures. that was our inauguration of the casa. they still hadn't pulled up the fourth bomb yet, by the way, when he inaugurated him, but i think we didn't --mented to open it because it's a way to show, hey, look, we know there's still a missing bomb, but we're culture people, opening up a cultural center here, and frogger and duke also both came to the opening of the casa americana because frogger wanted to identify himself with something culture too. we had the inauguration. i'm the only one who, i
a drunken mexican. that is the only good thing i can say about them. they are a miserable race with a few intelligent man. three quarters of the men or more are peons and treachery and deceit and stealing are the particular characteristics. it would make a miserable addition to any portion of the population of the united states. to another friend he wrote just a week later that the only difference between the peons and the slaves of the south is their color, and he says, as for making these peons voters in the united states, it should not be thought of until we give all indians about. these are his thoughts on what is happening in mexico. this tragedy occurred after only three months. he told a third friend that although i was for all of this mexico and having an annex to the united states, i doubt whether it is worth it. people are not better than the country. and so harding's evolution to his ego phobic person was not uncommon. it was shared by many. it was midwesterners who shared enthusiasm for the woes of mexico. but many decided it wasn't such a great idea after all. their exposure
lead by the british has gone around the world on the global surface. which sounded miserable. it must be said. it has been done on the polar route. mostly aviation. thank you. >> [inaudible] because you mentioned that -- [inaudible] that kind of contraption. >> aerial. >> sorry. aerial. >> even so . >> it was a company possibly named i guess i never looked for the reason. it might be a family name. i guess shakespeare. [inaudible] >> that would have been very nice. but -- motorcycles at that point had amaze dpli powerless motors. so this was a step up from the bicycle but only just. yeah. yeah. >> can you tell us something about the illustration. >> yes, the title of the book is taken from shakespeare. it's he will put the girdle around the world. no one has down that even in orbit. the stietle "round about the earth: circumnavigation from magellan to orbit." my pubture -- publishers gave me the scantily clad guy running around the world. [inaudible] air travel made it easier and i guess some people tried to make it harder. i mean, amelia earhart went from west to east around the e eq
of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the original tea party and tea party movement were about. far from being patriots, the original tea partyers were smugglers. some of them, among the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy
didn't the differents of economics seems to be clear. that field that done miserably is macroeconomics and financial economics. these repeals of marc -- macroeconomics had the view that bubbles don't exist. that are efficient. it was the central doctrine of the large part of the macroeconomics. they have models used by central banks which there were no banks. it was very pee call already. how could a central bank talk about macroeconomics without banks? well, they did. and the predictions were very bad and the ability to respond to the crisis once it happened was not very good. when it happened they would make statements like don't worry, the crisis is contained when obviously it wasn't. in my mind, as we look across the field, the big failure was in macroeconomics and finance and the financial markets had all these properties and, you know, a lot of people actually believe the models. that was really the big mistake. both in the public and the private sector there was consequences. >> and if you did read the bocks or the old -- the odd thing is if you had a view of macroeconomics base
explorer has gone around the world on the surface which just sounded miserable. mostly aviation. >> your story captured my imagination in part because you mentioned an era cycle. i would like to know where i come by one. can you say a little bit more about what kind of contraption that was? >> aerial. >> it was just the company's name. possibly named, i guess i've never looked for the reason, it might be a family name, but i guessed out of shakespeare. >> and leonardo stream. >> that would have been very nice. motorcycles at that point had amazingly powerless motors. so this was a step up from bicycle, but only just. >> can you tell us something about the illustration? >> yes. the title of the book is taken from shakespeare. it is his post that he will put a girl round about the earth in 40 minutes, still the fastest on record, no one has actually ever done that, even in orbit. so the title is a round about the earth. my publisher gave me this great picture of scantily clad elf dashing around the world, so that is pock trying to keep up with his own stated time. >> i was intrigued by you
like ours. ours was a months monthlong and it was miserable. i came out of that a changed human being, for the better. i lost almost all of my cockiness and quite a few tailfeathers and spent the next decade being a weapons and tactics officer at a different level than a fighter wing. i was in khobar towers when that blew up. do you guys remember that? always in the wrong place at the wrong time. i was there when that place blew up. we hadn't really, i don't think any of us was thinking about terrorism the way that is thought about now. it wasn't something we were prepared to fight. my generation was geared to fight the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rou
so miserable that they quit or they get them fired. you would have ones in every so often that would say something like that, reach out in some humane sort of way as one person to another, that they didn't last very long. >> you write about being in prison and your expensive there, and the trial and all of this going on that's been heaped upon you. and jesse and jason, and yet you sit here tonight and you see people standing in line who are crying as they are asking you questions. because they are so appreciative of you being here, and also have so much empathy for you. you feel like india sort of score of your life you have at this point way more love than sort of hatred come your way? >> yeah. i think the hatred was probably at one point more widespread, but even in the times whenever the world hated me, whenever they were trying to murder me, there was still this really, really deep bottomless pool of love in different sources that kept me going. so i think really whenever you start putting it on scales and weigh me, i think the love that i've been given in my life far outweighs t
war, what would you think? well, savely was well entrenched. the black methamphetamine were miserable, the whites cruel and indifference. that's actually not true at all. in washington -- washington had 30 thousands people then as a city. 12,000 were black. the majority of the people in 1830 were free, were not slaves out of the 12,000 people, slightly more than half were free. >> what led to washington, d.c.'s first race riots in 1835? what part did francis scott key play? jefferson recounts this almost forgotten chapter in history in "snowstorm in august" on c-span2's booktv.org. >> we don't know whether franklin roosevelt heard about forest greenberg's unprecedented call for health care as a right because even though he had endorsed the conference, he chose that time to go on vacation. frksz dr was actually on a cruise. it was probably a well-deserved vacation. three years earlier, he refused to include medical coverage because he didn't want to antagonize the american medical profession. he did send a message of support to the health department corchtion, but not long afterwards,
of the south. they would make a miserable addition to any portion of the population of the united states. to another friend he wrote a week later that the only difference between the peons of mexico and slaves of the south is their color. he sent us for making these peons voters and citizens of the united states, it should not be thought of until we give out news about. so these are hardened thoughts on what's happening in mexico. the transformation occurred after only three months in mexico. he told the third friend, he said, although i was for annexing of the mexico before he came here, yet i now doubt whether it's worth it. so much for mexico's people are not better than the country. harden's evolution from this expansion is introducing a phobic cynic of the war was a rapid one, but it wasn't uncommon. hardin's views are shared by many in the army. like i said, midwesterner so do most of the csm for the war with mexico's, but many decided it wasn't such a great idea after all. their exposure of the land led them to question the future of manifest destiny and frankly commanders were no
by scientists has gone around the world which just sounded miserable. so it hasn't been done on the polar route. most of the aviation went on the surface. thank you. >> captured my imagination because of the arrow cycle and i would like to know where i could buy one. can you say little more about that and what kind of contraption that was? >> aerial. aeriel. >> even so. >> was just a company's name, possibly name, and never i've never looked for the reason, it might give family name but i think it's from shakespeare. [inaudible] >> that would have been very nice but motorcycles at that point had amazingly powerless motors. this was a step up from the bicycle. >> can you tell us something about the illustration? >> oh, yes. the title of the book is taken from shakespeare. he will put a girdle round about the earth in 40 minutes, still the fastest on record. no one has actually ever done that even in orbits of the title is "round about the earth" and my publisher gave me this great picture of a scantily-clad elf dancing -- dashing around the world, trying to keep up. >> you comment that air tr
, you know, the black people were miserable, the whites were kind of cruel and indifferent. and that's actually not true at all. in washington, um, in washington -- washington had about 30,000 people then as a city, 12,000 of them were black. the majority of the black people in washington actually in 1830 were free, were not slaves out of the 12,000 black people, slightly more than half were free. >> what led to washington, d.c.'s first race riots in 1835, and what part did francis scott key play? jefferson morley recounts this almost forgotten chapter in american history in "snowstorm in august," monday night at 10 eastern part of c-span2's booktv. >> washington post correspondent and author rajiv command chandr. his newest book "the little america." mr. chandrasekaran, when you talk about little america, what are you talking about? >> guest: i'm talking about this remarkable community that the americans built in the deserts of southern afghanistan not in the last couple years, but six decades ago. back when, unknown to most of our countrymen, there were dozens and dozens of america
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12